Posted by: caryandjohn | March 22, 2011

Cincinnatti

Cary and Cousin Liz

Cary and Cousin Liz

Cary had a conference this weekend in Cincinnati with the Association for Gerontology in Higher Education (AGHE), the same conference that we attended in Reno last year.

We got in touch with Cousin Liz, because she’s in Columbus, Ohio. Liz drove down in a borrowed Prius, and spent a couple of nights with us in the Hilton, in the venerable Carew Tower, which was finished in 1931, and which enjoyed a through renovated in 1990. It is a beautiful art deco building, one of the first “skyscrapers” and one of the first multi-use buildings, or “city within a city” real estate development.

Cousin Liz is a principle partner at Fulcrum Creatives, a firm which caters to non-profit entities, helping to promote, or “brand,” them. The business is doing pretty well considering the current economy, so Liz was ready for a couple of days off …

Cousin Liz and art deco tiles in the Carew Tower arcade

Cousin Liz and art deco tiles in the Carew Tower arcade

The view of the Ohio River from our room

The view of the Ohio River from our room

We asked for a view when we checked in to the Hilton, and got a south facing room on the 24th floor, with a wonderful view of the flooding Ohio River and the old Robeling Suspension Bridge that was finished in 1867, and which was the first suspension bridge built in the United States.

Dinner to celebrate Saint Patrick's Day

Dinner to celebrate Saint Patrick's Day

Cousin Liz showed up around 6 p.m. on Thursday night, St. Patrick’s Day, and we went out to celebrate in the “Queen City.” This was a Mexican/Tappas restaurant a short walk from the hotel.

The fountain in Fountain Square

The fountain in Fountain Square

After a good dinner we celebrated Saint Patrick’s Day in Fountain Square, with some green accesries that Liz got for us, and live music. Cincionatti’s nickname is “The Queen City,” which it earned in the 1850s during the steamboat age, when it was one of the largest cities in the US, at the edge of theyoung nation’s western expansion.  We found the city to be a charming mix of 19th centry buildings and early 20th century skyscrapers. Cincinatti is also the home of the NFL’s Bengals and baseball’s Reds, which both have riverfront stadiums downtown.

A tugboat on the Ohio River in front of the Great American Ballpark

A tugboat on the Ohio River in front of the Great American Ballpark

We took a walk on Saturday afternoon, across the Roebling Suspension Bridge, and into Covington, which is in northern Kentucky, at the confluence of the Licking and Ohio Rivers.

Riverside Park, Covington, Kentucky

Riverside Park, Covington, Kentucky

The Roebling Suspesion Bridge across the Ohio River

The Roebling Suspesion Bridge across the Ohio River

Cary in front of one of the beautiful 19th century mansions

Cary in front of one of the beautiful 19th century mansions

The Riverside Drive area in Covington has many beautiful homes and mansions that were built in the steamboat era  [around 1850] by people who had made their fourtunes when the country’s huge rivers was the only means of transportation.

On Sunday we took another walk, across the Purple People pedestran bridge and the Taylor Southgate Bridge to  Newport on the Levee, an attraction with restaurants, shopping, movie theaters and a world-class aquarium.

The Daniel Carter Beard bridge for I-471

The Daniel Carter Beard bridge for I-471

We got to see a couple of the neat tug boats that push huge bardges upand down the Ohio River.

A huge tugboat pushing bardges up the flooded Ohio River

A huge tugboat pushing bardges up the flooded Ohio River

It was fun to see these huge vessels struggling upstream in the spring flood.

One of the smaller tugs pushing downstream

One of the smaller tugs pushing downstream

Cary and I had a nice visit with Cousin Liz, and are looking forward to seeing her again in NOvember when we’re planning to have a party at Flo’s home (Cary’s mom) near Richmond, Virginia.

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